• Buachalánbuí – my weed, your daisy, anthotype on watercolour paper
  • Buachalánbuí – your daisy, my weed, anthotype on watercolour paper
  • Disturbed land I, anthotype on watercolour paper
  • Eucalyptus shadow II, anthotype on watercolour paper
  • Eucalyptus shadow IV, anthotype on watercolour paper
  • Flowers from the blanket bog I, anthotype on watercolour paper
  • Flowers from the blanket bog II, anthotype on watercolour paper
  • When the gorse is out of blossom…, anthotype on watercolour paper
  • Prickly margins, anthotype on watercolour paper
  • Suspended II, feather and blackberry daguerreotype photogram

The dark reactions

08 April - 30 April 2016

Michelle Culpitt is a photo media artist whose experimental methods include anthotypes, a pre-photographic process using photosensitive material from plants to create an image.

 

Anthotypes were invented by Sir William Herschel in 1842. The process involves coating a sheet of paper with an emulsion that has been extracted from light-sensitive plant material. An object such as a plant is then placed on the paper and exposed to sun-light until the background is bleached out. Color remains in the shaded or protected areas creating subtle, shadowy images.

 

Michelle Culpitt’s imagery explores organic elements of place, history and the environment. The dark reactions refer to a part of the photosynthesis process in plants that occurs in the second phase of photosynthesis that does not require the presence of light.

 

The works include native plants from Darwin, weeds from Castlemaine in Victoria and native plants in Carna and Anaghmakerrig in Ireland.

 

Read the opening speech by Dr Greg Leach

 

View the works on the online gallery

Exhibitions Archive