• Desert Twigs, etching by Marlene Rubuntja
  • Nanny Goats, silkscreen by Marjorie Keighran
  • Bullock, silkscreen by Stewart Hoosan
  • Eagle Hawk and Crow, silkscreen by Stewart Hoosan
  • Uneven Sides silkscreen by Dion Beasley
  • Untitled, etching by Ray James Tjangala

Inner Worlds II

01 October - 31 October 2020

 

Marlene Rabuntja, Marjorie Keighran,
Stewart Hoosan, Dion Beasley and Ray James Tjangala

 

This month we continue to explore the imaginative world of artists who are celebrated for their distinctive personal styles. These works take us on a visual journey through memories and observations of people who live across Australia. They draw us into a world of experiences and knowledge through imagery of animals, plants and places that embody remote life. We hope you enjoy Inner Worlds ll.

 

Marlene Rubuntja

Marlene draws inspiration from what she sees around her at Yarrenyty Arltere Town Camp in Alice Springs. She is interested in telling proudly the stories of her ancestors as well as her husband’s country atKalkarindji. These are the delicate twigs that fall from the desert trees.

 

Marjorie Keighran

Marjorie is a senior Garrwa woman, whose Dreaming is Kananganja (Emu). Marjorie was born at Westmoreland Station on the NT and Queensland border. She grew up at Wollogorang station and Red Bank Mine, south-east of Borroloola, where she spent her days hunting and gathering bush tucker. Many of Marjorie’s paintings contain images of nanny goats as she spent many of her teenage days on the station at Robinson River herding and looking after them: “We’d look after them and take them down to the water and take them back up again”.

 

Stewart Hoosan

Stewart Hoosan depicts life and the history of the people around Borroloola, a remote community on the McArthur River in the Northern Territory, set in an arresting landscape of rocky hills, cattle-grazed scrub, billabongs, and wide horizons. Hoosan’s images are layered with a sense of past histories and continuing connections set amongst the distinctive beauty of the surrounding landscape, flora and fauna.

 

Dion Beasley

Being profoundly deaf Dion has experienced many challenges throughout his life but has developed a great passion for drawing, which has served as a means of communication with others. Dion’s delightful depiction of dogs form the basis of the majority of his drawings. Dion’s personal expression focuses on the camp dogs that are central to the life of Aboriginal communities, with its own dramas, tensions and energies.

 

Ray James Tjangala

Tjangala’s print is part of a suite of etchings by Papunya Tula artists which demonstrates the strength of each artist as they successfully translate their Tjukurrpa to the medium of etching. Tjangala’s image relates to the soakage water site Yunala, west of Kiwirrkura community in Western Australia. In ancestral times a large group of Tingari Men camped at this site before continuing their travels further east to Pinari, north-west of Kintore community. While at Yunala they gathered the edible roots of the bush banana or silky pear vine, (Marsdenia australis), also known as yunala, which is plentiful in the region. The designs in the etching represent body paint worn during ceremonies relating to Yunala.

 

View works online:

Marlene Rabuntja

Marjorie Keighran

Stewart Hoosan

Dion Beasley

Ray James Tjangala

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